At first blush, careers in craftsmanship may seem antiquated, conjuring images of a blacksmith working a forge or a seamstress operating a loom. However archaic these crafts may seem, creative endeavors like these and others still are viable commodities.  The creative industry is projected to grow 4 percent by 2026 and add nearly 35,000 jobs, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Knowing this, it’s fair to wonder how technology has changed the way creatives, well, create. Do woodworkers still saw and sand by hand? How has digital imaging changed the way photographers deliver portraits? To find out, we set out to capture Eastside artisans on the job.  From the invention of the camera obscura more than 1,000 years ago, to daguerreotype studios of the mid- to late-1800s to shopping mall portrait studios like Glamour Shots, portraiture always has been considered an artful occupation. However, the technological advances that placed cameras in many pockets largely challenged the field. How can one artisan compete against every millennial with a smartphone camera in portrait mode? One Eastside couple has an answer.  After lengthy corporate careers in California, D...