Ho-Chunk Nation members, the artist’s family members and city officials met in July to discuss what it would take to move the “Hiawatha” statue off city land. Ho-Chunk Nation members, the artist’s family members and city officials met in July to discuss what it would take to move the “Hiawatha” statue off city land. Since 1961, the “Hiawatha” statue has stood where three rivers meet at Riverside Park in La Crosse. To some, the 25-foot statue created by a local artist is a symbol of our Native American legacy. To others, it’s an offensive caricature. Here’s hoping it can become a symbol of compromise, an example of what can happen when all parties get together to discuss solutions instead of grievances. We understand why a number of family and friends don’t want to see the work of artist Anthony Zimmerhakl destroyed, but it may well be past the time that the statue find a new home. We also understand those who find the statue — especially in its current location — disrespectful. Mayor Tim Kabat, members of the Zimmerhakl family and members of the Ho-Chunk Nation met last week to explore options for moving the statue to private land elsewhere i...